More Frogs of Bognor Marsh

By James MacDougall

With these photos I have applied a variety of digital treatments to create a more painterly effect. They were taken in the Bognar Marsh near Owen Sound with a Nikon D5000 on an overcast day.

by James MacDougall
Marsh Dweller 01 by James MacDougall
Marsh Dweller 03 by James MacDougall
Marsh Dweller 02 by James MacDougall
Marsh Dweller 01 by James MacDougall
Marsh Dweller 03 by James MacDougall

 

The Frogs of Bognor Marsh

By James MacDougall

frog-009

frog-008

frog-007

frog-006

frog-005

frog-004

frog-003

frog-001

frog-010

 

Bognor Marsh

By James MacDougall

Driving down the highway I often wonder ‘what’s behind the trees?’ Today I answered a very small part of that very large question and discovered for myself the Bognor Conservation Area.

Described by Grey Sauble Conservation as covering “668 hectares of escarpment upland forests, three major marshes, reforested areas, natural regeneration areas, and several small springs feeding the marsh and stream system.” It was much more sublime than this dry depiction.

From the highway we walked through a corridor of trees. Fungi of every shape and sort clung to dead wood and the bases of living trees, caramel dragonflies  and lilac butterflies flitted about. The trail ended in an open field and to our right the board-walk into the marsh began.The area opened up into a vast wetland populated by lilies and cat-tails. The songs of birds filled the air. Red-winged blackbirds, hawks and tree swallows were the most visible wildlife but snakes, frogs and turtles abound as well.

Trail to Bognor Marsh
Trail to Bognor Marsh

bognor-06

Dragon Fly

Dragon Fly

Lily Pads

Frog on lily pad
Frog on lily pad
Red-wing blackbird
Red-wing blackbird
Tree swallow
Tree swallow
Water snake
Water snake